Bushfires in the north and some decent rainfall in the Hunter - spring has arrived

Bees Nest Fire north of Ebor and Dorrigo has burnt through 94,000 hectares so far causing heartache to many. Photograph: Adam Dederer
Bees Nest Fire north of Ebor and Dorrigo has burnt through 94,000 hectares so far causing heartache to many. Photograph: Adam Dederer
It can still rain

It can still rain

Horrendous bushfire weather at the start of spring across northern NSW and Southern Queensland does not augur well for the summer season.

To date the Bees Nest Fire north of Ebor and north west of Dorrigo has burnt through 94,000 hectares, including areas of ancient rainforest, affecting many landholders who are now faced with handfeeding livestock and rebuilding fences and infrastructure.Donations of fodder were quick to arrive in Dorrigo to support local farmers and BlazeAid will also once again play a vital role in rebuilding not only fences but community spirits with their tremendous work.

Tinder dry conditions throughout the region means unless decent rainfall arrives soon the bushfire threat will be remain extremely high. The Hunter Valley was fortunate to receive some decent falls with the last cool change with the best along the coast but this time, unlike the falls in late August, the clouds did make it further up the Valley. Scone district recorded between 15-25mm and Merriwa 12-20mm - the best falls since May likewise around Singleton with falls of 25-70mm once again the best since March.

In the lower Hunter Dungog recorded 60mm and Maitland 50mm. The Mid North Coast missed out on any decent rain this time with Dorrigo 40mm and Comboyne 33mm the only centres inland to trouble the rain gauge. However Comboyne was hit by a severe hailstorm damaging avocado and blueberry crops.