Indigenous mural complete at King Street Public School

A whole school effort has paid off, as students and teachers from King Street Public School contributed to a brand new masterpiece featured in the Wonnarua Kurany Kantu (bush tucker garden) at the school.

The nature of the mural is Wanay Kunarrwhich means children and families.

NEW MURAL: Aunty Pauline and students in front of the brand new mural.

NEW MURAL: Aunty Pauline and students in front of the brand new mural.

Earlier this year Aunty Pauline Mitchell, the schools Aboriginal Education Officer, applied for a Newcastle based grant through 'Station Street' and it was successfully scored.

"After all this school has been through in the past twelve months, including losing three of our babies in the devastating house fire last year, I believe receiving the funding to do something like this was very special," said Aunty Pauline.

"The purpose of the mural is to unite the school together.

"It doesn't matter what happens when you walk out those school gates, when you are at school we are all come together," she said.

"It's important to show young ones and lead the young ones in the right direction."

The concept of the artwork is that Tawny, the school mascot, has gathered all students, staff and families to go on their journeys over to Kawal.

TAWNY: School mascot Tawny

TAWNY: School mascot Tawny

Baby, the hand prints represent their travels, is provided with a blanket by Tawny with his wings to guide them safely over to the meeting place.

There at the meeting place, they listen to the elders who will give them the most meaningful lessons guiding them how to travel down their paths to a better life.

The child will then take that knowledge and use that knowledge through his life the bestow it in his family.

"I think its important that everybody knows about the history of the indigenous culture," Aunty Pauline continued.

"The contrast of the white hand prints and brown hand prints represents indigenous and non indigenous, and together it is unity."

The dedicated indigenous space is utilised for many things including reading lessons, group cooking and simply just a chill out space.

The new mural comes only a few months after the school built their yarning circle out the back the school

"The yarning circle has proven to be one of the most popular places to hang out in the school.

"The kids love coming in here and sitting under the big shady gum tree and sharing ideas and knowledge.

The purpose of the yarning circle is to provide the students and staff a safe place to share knowledge.

You enter the circle in one way and leave another if you have gained new knowledge. If you have not learnt anything new you return back out the way you came in.

YARNING CIRCLE: Enter the circle in one way and leave another if you have gained new knowledge. If you have not learnt anything new you return back out the way you came in.

YARNING CIRCLE: Enter the circle in one way and leave another if you have gained new knowledge. If you have not learnt anything new you return back out the way you came in.