National Parks and Wildlife Service are calling for all hands on deck this autumn to help remove environmental weeds from Barrington Tops National Park

National Parks and Wildlife Service are calling for all hands on deck this autumn to help remove environmental weeds from Barrington Tops National Park.

National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) Bush Regeneration & Volunteering Officer Boyd Carney said the Carters Road Wildfire, which impacted the southern end of the Barrington Plateau had cleared the way for environmental weeds, like Scotch Broom, to thrive.

"More than 4000 hectares of the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area on the Barrington Tops was impacted by the "Black Summer" bushfires.

"With the fire damaging or destroying swathes of native vegetation, and stimulating seed germination, Scotch Broom has sprung up across the park, outcompeting our precious native plants in some areas.

"We're seeking volunteers to help us 'nip this in the bud'. By physically removing the weeds, we can prevent them from spreading and setting seed.

"This will help the Tops to recover by creating space for native plants to regrow and flourish, and providing expanded, healthy habitat for native fauna, like the Broad-toothed rat, and the Spotted-tailed Quoll," said Mr Carney.

Supplementing its annual program and using funding from the Saving our Species program, Hunter Local Land Services and the Commonwealth Bushfire Recovery grants, NPWS treated 700 hectares of mature scotch broom in 2020.

"We have six volunteer working bees planned for the coming months," said Mr Carney. "Over two days, volunteers will be helping us to cut unburnt mature broom plants and emerging seedlings around Junction Pools and Edwards Swamp.

"Volunteers are invited to camp for free at Little Murray Campground the night before their working bee, or to stay the night after the activity, to help manage fatigue and to give you more time to enjoy the Barrington Tops National Park. "We're seeking 30 volunteers for each working bee, so if you're interested in getting your hands dirty and helping the Tops to recover, book your spot on our website," said Mr Carney. NPWS will supply tools and safety equipment for broom control works.

This project has been supported by Hunter LLS through the Australian Government's National Landcare Program and the NSW State Government's bushfire response programs.

The introduced and invasive Scotch Broom that thrives in the Barrington Tops. Photo: NPWS.

The introduced and invasive Scotch Broom that thrives in the Barrington Tops. Photo: NPWS.