At Singleton Library you can now do more than just read about growing your own veggies and flowers you can 'borrow' the seeds

At Singleton Library you can now do more than just read about growing your own veggies and flowers you can 'borrow' the seeds to make your garden productive.

Singleton Library's seed bank. Photo supplied.

Singleton Library's seed bank. Photo supplied.

Singleton Council in collaboration with Slow Food Singleton have just established a seed library to enable the local community to sustainably grow food and plants.

Library members can take three packets of seeds every two months to grow in their garden and from those crops the members can collect some seeds and return them to the library.

Currently there are 15 different varieties to choose from at the Singleton Seed Library with the selection based on the season.

Current varieties include; Calendula, Marigold Dwarf Orange, Marigold Dwarf Yellow, Broad Beans, Warrugal Greens, Broccoli, Red Onion, Carrot, Onion, Cauliflower, Mescalun Mix, Rocket, Kale, Bean Bush & Snow Peas.

Singleton Council's Anthony Egan, Council's Director Business and Community Services said as Council staff were not experts on food or seed production and collection they were working with Slow Food Singleton.

"Our aim to create interest in the community for people to sustainably grow food and plants," he said.

"The seeds available will be based on the season and what we know does well in our area. After just one day of operation we have seen tremendous interest in the idea."

The seeds available now came from the closest organic seed supplier.

With an official launch expected in the spring where it will also involve local schools and the community garden Mr Egan encouraged people to think about getting growing areas ready for the next season's plantings.

"Once you harvest the veggies or flowers you can collect the seeds and return some to the library. I n the long term we hope to build a seed library that contains best varieties for our district and seeds that help us grow our biodiversity," he said.

People can also donate seeds if they wish to the library provided they have details on varieties, when and where grown and when harvested.