Singleton Council’s war on plastic

Soft plastics will be targeted in Singleton Council’s latest initiative to reduce waste with the official launch of a new alliance with Plastic Police Partnerships on Wednesday morning.

The Waste Management Facility on Dyrring Road will be a collection point for soft plastics, such as shopping bags, chip packets and packaging, which will then be passed on to the Plastic Police for recycling into usable items such as benches.

Mayor, Cr Sue Moore, and Samantha Cross from Plastic Police Partnerships were part of a special event at the Waste Management Facility this morning, marking the first launch in the Hunter.

Cr Moore said Council’s agreement with Plastic Police Partnerships followed on from the opening of the Burragan Recycling Shop last year and the introduction of the Garden Organics collection earlier this year.

NEW INITIATIVE: Samantha Cross from Plastic Police Partnerships and Mayor of Singleton, Cr Sue Moore, officially cut the plastic ribbon at this morning’s launch. (The plastic ribbon will be recycled.)

NEW INITIATIVE: Samantha Cross from Plastic Police Partnerships and Mayor of Singleton, Cr Sue Moore, officially cut the plastic ribbon at this morning’s launch. (The plastic ribbon will be recycled.)

“Singleton is getting quite a reputation for our commitment to waste management, and rightly so,” she said.

“Our community has told us that a commitment to sustainability and reducing our environmental footprint was important to them, which has been further demonstrated in the way our residents have embraced waste initiatives such as the Burragan Recycling Shop and the Garden Organics collection.

“I have no doubt the Plastic Police Partnerships initiative will be an avenue for people to continue to reconsider what they throw away and reduce the waste going into landfill.”

General Manager Jason Linnane said Council was excited to be involved in a great initiative that would have significant results for the community and the environment.

“We’ve all seen soft plastics in the environment, either with plastic bags blowing in the wind or chip packets littering our streets,” he said.

“The agreement between Council and Plastic Police Partnerships will change the way we look at this kind of litter as a valuable resource that has the potential to become other usable products.

“It’s a great credit to the people at Plastic Police Partnerships for coming up with new ways to use soft plastics, as well as Council’s waste team for identifying the potential of the program for our community.”

People can get involved in the program by taking their soft plastics to the Waste Management Facility for recycling.

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