‘Girthy; with Slim Edges' will be making a stop in Singleton

FINAL EXHIBITION: Scholarship winner Bobbie Bayley last week setting up in Sydney, which was the second stop on the nation-wide tour.
FINAL EXHIBITION: Scholarship winner Bobbie Bayley last week setting up in Sydney, which was the second stop on the nation-wide tour.

Six months after successfully completing the epic adventure that was ‘The Grand Section’, Byera Hadley Travelling Scholarship recipient Bobbie Bayley has embarked on her next journey – exhibiting her valuable work.

While the days of peddling across Australia are behind her, she is committed to sharing the unique insights gained while visiting rural and remote communities along the 25th latitude - from Fraser Island in Queensland to Dorre Island off Western Australia (around 7600kms).

The express purpose of the 10-month bicycle and architectural odyssey was to better understand the relationship between place and habitation, or as Bobbie says relieving the unscratched itch she was left with after completing her university studies.

And, the passionate young architect is bringing the groundbreaking roving exhibition to her home town of Singleton in September.

Launched in Newcastle at three separate events from June 1 – 2, Bobbie and her partner in crime, Owen Kelly, are about to make their third stop in Melbourne.

Where Bobbie says they hope to inspire those who are both practicing and studying architecture – along with the general public –  to learn more about our country and to apply this knowledge when designing for it rather than looking outwards.

‘Girthy; with Slim Edges’ is described as showcasing the work from a year-long study of Australia’s architecture, east to west. 

Broadening the conversation about architecture and Australia, the exhibition delivers our nations innards to its outer fringes.

Giving insight into the reality of the regional and remote areas of this country and the connection between environments, people and buildings.

Bobbie says each display box in the pop-up exhibition collates what they learned at each stop.

“At the end of our week long stay in every town we would present our findings back to the community as a thank you,” she explains.

“Sometimes no one turned up but so far there has been a lot of interest in this exhibition from professionals and the general public.”